Knowing the background of the target journal and choosing the appropriate editing and translation language is also important. Perhaps not obvious to all non-native English speakers, but British English and American English are known to be quite different, not only in spelling, but also in grammar and in some terminologies used in some fields of research. Some journals may specify if what style English to be used, in which case, the author should write and have it edited in the appropriate style. This is also why language style is a specification Uni-edit discuss with customers. British and American Englishes differ in various dimensions, including grammar, vocabulary, units, idioms, and terminologies cultural references. (reference:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English). To a large extent, the terminology and idiom dimensions can vary across all the English-speaking countries including Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries. In academic writing, particular attention should be paid to the different meanings terminologies have, or if they make sense to a particular audience. For instance, in British English the word ‘quite’ often means ‘very’, rather than ‘somewhat’, even though this confusion is subtle, to some readers it might still make a big difference.

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